Welcome to the Equity and Family Engagement Department

  •  

     

     Shoreline Equity Logo with African Texture Border

    Shoreline Equity and Family Engagement Department

    The Purpose: To create urgency and immediate impact on students of color, and culturally and linguistically diverse students using culturally responsive practices and policies, while building racial equity awareness and skills with Shoreline staff. The work of the equity department expands throughout all district departments and programs. The goal is to lead and develop with equity in mind while examining and shifting  the inequities in our procedures, policies and practices. This work attends to hearts and minds so that we can make changes in structures and systems. The students are our non-negotiable WHY. 

     

    welcome sign, wood with white letters 

    We welcome you back for the 2022-2023 school year!

    Latinx and Hispanic Heritage Month | Office for Equity, Diversity, and  Inclusion | University of Pittsburgh

    Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation
    The 2022 Hispanic Heritage Month national theme is Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation.During National Hispanic Heritage Month, from September 15 – October 15, the U.S. government celebrates the countless contributions of more than 60 million Hispanic Americans, Latinos, Latinas, and Latinx-identifying people to our culture and society.

     

    Our Value Statement

     

    We value all diversity in our students and families and staff. Our hearts are with every group that has ever been targeted, been historically marginalized, been harassed, been abused, been publicly mocked and any other hurtful action. Shoreline students, families and staff should thrive and flourish. We aim to create the environment where that happens for us all.

    Anti racism quote oluo

     

     

     

     

     

     

      

     

Department Contacts

Book of the Month

  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/19/2022

    Cover of Book with red truck

    Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be.

    Comments (-1)

Wordology

  • Body Positivity

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 5/19/2022

    Body positivity refers to the assertion that all people deserve to have a positive body image, regardless of how society and popular culture view ideal shape, size, and appearance. Some of the goals of the body positivity movement include: Challenging how society views the body. Promoting the acceptance of all bodies.

    More Information

    Comments (-1)
  • Indigenous

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 11/4/2021
     
     

     
    Indigenous peoples are inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures and ways of relating to people and the environment. They have retained social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live.
    Comments (-1)
  • AAPI

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 5/12/2021

    Asian, Asian Americans, Pacific Islander

    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) are an integral part of the American cultural mosaic, encompassing a wide range of diversity. AAPI communities consist of approximately 50 ethnic groups speaking over 100 languages, with connections to Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean, Hawaiian, and other Asian and Pacific Islander ancestries.

    Over 24 million Americans, or 7.3% of the U.S. population, are AAPI; however, about two-thirds of the population identify with their specific ethnicity or country of origin.

    Comments (-1)
  • LatinX

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/2/2020
    Comments (-1)
  • Types of Racism

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/10/2020

    Race and Racism

    The idea of race has a complex history.  It has been used for centuries to categorize, reward, and penalize people based on perceived differences.  Despite often being misguidedly defined by skin tone and other physical attributes, race has no genetic basis.  This powerful social construction has a tremendous impact on individuals’ lives because it is often employed to establish and maintain privilege and power dynamics.  Access to resources and opportunities are often distributed along racial lines.

    Commonly defined as “prejudice + power,” racism is prejudice or discrimination against someone based on his/her race.  Underlying this is the belief that certain racial groups are superior to others.  Racism can be manifested through beliefs, policies, attitudes, and actions.  Racism comes in several forms, including:

     

    Individual or internalized racism – This is racism that exists within individuals.  It is when one holds negative ideas about his/her own culture, even if unknowingly.  Xenophobic feelings or one’s internalized sense of oppression/privilege are two examples of individual or internalized racism.

     

    Interpersonal racism – This is the racism that occurs between individuals.  It is the holding of negative attitudes towards a different race or culture.  Interpersonal racism often follows a victim/perpetrator model.

     

    Institutional racism – Recognizing that racism need not be individualist or intentional, institutional racism refers to institutional and cultural practices that perpetuate racial inequality.  Benefits are structured to advantage powerful groups as the expense of others.  Jim Crow laws and redlining practices are two examples of institutional racism.

     

    Structural racism – Structural racism refers to the ways in which the joint operation of institutions (i.e., inter-institutional arrangements and interactions) produce racialized outcomes, even in the absence of racist intent.  Indicators of structural racism include power inequalities, unequal access to opportunities, and differing policy outcomes by race.  Because these effects are reinforced across multiple institutions, the root causes of structural racism are difficult to isolate.  Structural racism is cumulative, pervasive, and durable.

    Comments (-1)
  • disability

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 10/2/2019

    The ADA defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. This includes people who have a record of such an impairment, even if they do not currently have a disability. It also includes individuals who do not have a disability but are regarded as having a disability. The ADA also makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person based on that person’s association with a person with a disability.

    Comments (-1)
  • Family Engagement

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/2/2019

    Family Engagement: Amended by Annie Gage- Family Advocate

    Family engagement describes what families do at home and in the community to support their children's learning and development. It also encompasses the shared partnership and responsibility, specifically with underserved families, between home and school. Such engagement is essential for school improvement.

    Comments (-1)
  • Multiracial

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 5/9/2019

    Biracial identity development includes self-identification A multiracial or biracialperson is someone whose parents or ancestors are from different ethnic backgrounds. ... While multiracial identity development refers to the process of identity development of individuals who self-identify with multiple racial groups.

    Comments (-1)
  • Agender

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 3/15/2019

    Agender is a term which can be literally translated as 'without gender'. It can be seen either as a non-binary gender identity or as a statement of not having a gender identity. People who identify as agender may describe themselves as one or more of the following: Genderless or lacking gender.

    Comments (-1)
  • Black Lives Matter

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 2/4/2019

    Black Lives Matter

    The Black Lives Matter Global Network is a chapter-based, member-led organization whose mission is to build local power and to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes.

    BLM is expansive. BLM is a collective of liberators who believe in an inclusive and spacious movement. BLM also believe that in order to win and bring as many people with us along the way, they must move beyond the narrow nationalism that is all too prevalent in Black communities.

    BLM affirms the lives of Black queer and trans folks, disabled folks, undocumented folks, folks with records, women, and all Black lives along the gender spectrum. Our network centers those who have been marginalized within Black liberation movements.

    BLM are working for a world where Black lives are no longer systematically targeted for demise.

    Black Lives Matter Website

    Comments (-1)