Welcome to the Equity and Family Engagement Department

  •  

     

     Shoreline Equity Logo with African Texture Border

    Shoreline Equity and Family Engagement Department

    The Purpose: To create urgency and immediate impact on students of color, and culturally and linguistically diverse students using culturally responsive practices and policies, while building racial equity awareness and skills with Shoreline staff. The work of the equity department expands throughout all district departments and programs. The goal is to lead and develop with equity in mind while examining and shifting  the inequities in our procedures, policies and practices. This work attends to hearts and minds so that we can make changes in structures and systems. The students are our non-negotiable WHY. 

     

    Asian American and PI Month

    During Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, our Nation recognizes the innumerable contributions, vibrant cultures, and rich heritage of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AA and NHPIs).  As some of the fastest-growing racial and ethnic groups in the Nation, AA and NHPI communities represent a multitude of ethnicities, languages, and experiences. (whitehouse.gov)

    Resources from Library of Congress

    Resources from History.org

     

    Break the stigma

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Our Value Statement

      

    We value all diversity in our students and families and staff. Our hearts are with every group that has ever been targeted, been historically marginalized, been harassed, been abused, been publicly mocked and any other hurtful action. Shoreline students, families and staff should thrive and flourish. We aim to create the environment where that happens for us all.

    Anti racism quote oluo

     

     

     

     

     

     

      

     

Department Contacts

Book of the Month

  • 1619 Project

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/28/2022

    Nikole Hannah Jones

    In late August 1619, a ship arrived in the British colony of Virginia bearing a cargo of twenty to thirty enslaved people from Africa. Their arrival led to the barbaric and unprecedented system of American chattel slavery that would last for the next 250 years. This is sometimes referred to as the country’s original sin, but it is more than that: It is the source of so much that still defines the United States.

    The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story builds on The New York Times Magazine’s award-winning “1619 Project,” which reframed our understanding of American history by placing slavery and its continuing legacy at the center of our national narrative. This book substantially expands on the original "1619 Project, "weaving together eighteen essays that explore the legacy of slavery in present-day America with thirty-six poems and works of fiction that illuminate key moments of oppression, struggle, and resistance. The essays show how the inheritance of 1619 reaches into every part of contemporary American society, from politics, music, diet, traffic, and citizenship to capitalism, religion, and our democracy itself. This legacy can be seen in the way we tell stories, the way we teach our children, and the way we remember. Together, the elements of the book reveal a new origin story for the United States, one that helps explain not only the persistence of anti-Black racism and inequality in American life today, but also the roots of what makes the country unique.

    The book also features an elaboration of the original project’s Pulitzer Prize–winning lead essay by Nikole Hannah-Jones on how the struggles of Black Americans have expanded democracy for all Americans, as well as two original pieces from Hannah-Jones, one of which makes a case for reparative solutions to this legacy of injustice.
     

    Comments (-1)

Wordology

  • indigenous

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 11/4/2021
     
     

     
    Indigenous peoples are inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures and ways of relating to people and the environment. They have retained social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live.
    Comments (-1)
  • AAAPI

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 5/12/2021

    Asian, Asian Americans, Pacific Islander

    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) are an integral part of the American cultural mosaic, encompassing a wide range of diversity. AAPI communities consist of approximately 50 ethnic groups speaking over 100 languages, with connections to Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean, Hawaiian, and other Asian and Pacific Islander ancestries.

    Over 24 million Americans, or 7.3% of the U.S. population, are AAPI; however, about two-thirds of the population identify with their specific ethnicity or country of origin.

    Comments (-1)
  • LatinX

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/2/2020
    Comments (-1)
  • Types of Racism

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/10/2020

    Race and Racism

    The idea of race has a complex history.  It has been used for centuries to categorize, reward, and penalize people based on perceived differences.  Despite often being misguidedly defined by skin tone and other physical attributes, race has no genetic basis.  This powerful social construction has a tremendous impact on individuals’ lives because it is often employed to establish and maintain privilege and power dynamics.  Access to resources and opportunities are often distributed along racial lines.

    Commonly defined as “prejudice + power,” racism is prejudice or discrimination against someone based on his/her race.  Underlying this is the belief that certain racial groups are superior to others.  Racism can be manifested through beliefs, policies, attitudes, and actions.  Racism comes in several forms, including:

     

    Individual or internalized racism – This is racism that exists within individuals.  It is when one holds negative ideas about his/her own culture, even if unknowingly.  Xenophobic feelings or one’s internalized sense of oppression/privilege are two examples of individual or internalized racism.

     

    Interpersonal racism – This is the racism that occurs between individuals.  It is the holding of negative attitudes towards a different race or culture.  Interpersonal racism often follows a victim/perpetrator model.

     

    Institutional racism – Recognizing that racism need not be individualist or intentional, institutional racism refers to institutional and cultural practices that perpetuate racial inequality.  Benefits are structured to advantage powerful groups as the expense of others.  Jim Crow laws and redlining practices are two examples of institutional racism.

     

    Structural racism – Structural racism refers to the ways in which the joint operation of institutions (i.e., inter-institutional arrangements and interactions) produce racialized outcomes, even in the absence of racist intent.  Indicators of structural racism include power inequalities, unequal access to opportunities, and differing policy outcomes by race.  Because these effects are reinforced across multiple institutions, the root causes of structural racism are difficult to isolate.  Structural racism is cumulative, pervasive, and durable.

    Comments (-1)
  • disability

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 10/2/2019

    The ADA defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. This includes people who have a record of such an impairment, even if they do not currently have a disability. It also includes individuals who do not have a disability but are regarded as having a disability. The ADA also makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person based on that person’s association with a person with a disability.

    Comments (-1)
  • Family Engagement

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/2/2019

    Family Engagement: Amended by Annie Gage- Family Advocate

    Family engagement describes what families do at home and in the community to support their children's learning and development. It also encompasses the shared partnership and responsibility, specifically with underserved families, between home and school. Such engagement is essential for school improvement.

    Comments (-1)
  • Multiracial

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 5/9/2019

    Biracial identity development includes self-identification A multiracial or biracialperson is someone whose parents or ancestors are from different ethnic backgrounds. ... While multiracial identity development refers to the process of identity development of individuals who self-identify with multiple racial groups.

    Comments (-1)
  • Agender

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 3/15/2019

    Agender is a term which can be literally translated as 'without gender'. It can be seen either as a non-binary gender identity or as a statement of not having a gender identity. People who identify as agender may describe themselves as one or more of the following: Genderless or lacking gender.

    Comments (-1)
  • Black Lives Matter

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 2/4/2019

    Black Lives Matter

    The Black Lives Matter Global Network is a chapter-based, member-led organization whose mission is to build local power and to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes.

    BLM is expansive. BLM is a collective of liberators who believe in an inclusive and spacious movement. BLM also believe that in order to win and bring as many people with us along the way, they must move beyond the narrow nationalism that is all too prevalent in Black communities.

    BLM affirms the lives of Black queer and trans folks, disabled folks, undocumented folks, folks with records, women, and all Black lives along the gender spectrum. Our network centers those who have been marginalized within Black liberation movements.

    BLM are working for a world where Black lives are no longer systematically targeted for demise.

    Black Lives Matter Website

    Comments (-1)
  • Double Consciousness

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/2/2019

    Double consciousness is a concept that Du Bois first explores in 1903 publication, “The Souls of Black Folk”. Double consciousness describes the individual sensation of feeling as though your identity is divided into several parts, making it difficult or impossible to have one unified identity.

     

    Comments (-1)