Welcome to the Equity and Family Engagement Department

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    Shoreline Equity Department

    The Purpose: To create urgency and immediate impact on students of color, and culturally and liguistically diverse students using culturally responsive practices and policies, while building racial equity awareness and skills with Shoreline staff. The work of the equity department expands throughout all district departments and programs. The goal is to lead and develop with equity in mind while examining and shifting  the inequities in our procedures, polices and practices. This work attends to hearts and minds so that we can make changes in structures and systems. The students are our non-negotiable WHY.

     

     Happy new year

     

    Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King

    MLK at SW

    photo taken at Shorewood BSU Assembly 2018

    Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr., but later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating from high school at the age of fifteen; he received the B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College, a distinguished Negro institution of Atlanta from which both his father and grandfather had graduated. After three years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class, he was awarded the B.D. in 1951. With a fellowship won at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston he met and married Coretta Scott, a young woman of uncommon intellectual and artistic attainments. Two sons and two daughters were born into the family.

     

    In 1954, Martin Luther King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights for members of his race, King was, by this time, a member of the executive committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the leading organization of its kind in the nation. He was ready, then, early in December, 1955, to accept the leadership of the first great Negro nonviolent demonstration of contemporary times in the United States, the bus boycott described by Gunnar Jahn in his presentation speech in honor of the laureate. The boycott lasted 382 days. On December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court of the United States had declared unconstitutional the laws requiring segregation on buses, Negroes and whites rode the buses as equals. During these days of boycott, King was arrested, his home was bombed, he was subjected to personal abuse, but at the same time he emerged as a Negro leader of the first rank.

    In 1957 he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization formed to provide new leadership for the now burgeoning civil rights movement. The ideals for this organization he took from Christianity; its operational techniques from Gandhi. In the eleven-year period between 1957 and 1968, King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times, appearing wherever there was injustice, protest, and action; and meanwhile he wrote five books as well as numerous articles. In these years, he led a massive protest in Birmingham, Alabama, that caught the attention of the entire world, providing what he called a coalition of conscience. and inspiring his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, a manifesto of the Negro revolution; he planned the drives in Alabama for the registration of Negroes as voters; he directed the peaceful march on Washington, D.C., of 250,000 people to whom he delivered his address, “l Have a Dream”, he conferred with President John F. Kennedy and campaigned for President Lyndon B. Johnson; he was arrested upwards of twenty times and assaulted at least four times; he was awarded five honorary degrees; was named Man of the Year by Time magazine in 1963; and became not only the symbolic leader of American blacks but also a world figure.

    At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr., was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement.

    On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated.

    Read more here!

     

    We value all diversity in our students and families and staff. 

    Our hearts are with every group that has been targeted, been historically marginalized, been harassed, been abused, been publicly mocked and any other hurtful action. Shoreline students, familes and staff should thrive and flourish. Please hold us accountable to that.

    Diversity inclusive kindness make world safe for diversity

     

     

     

     

     

      

     

Department Contacts

Book of the Month

  • Becoming: Michelle Obama

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/2/2019

    In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare. 
     
    In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.

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Upcoming Events

Wordology

  • Double Consciousness

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/2/2019

    Double consciousness is a concept that Du Bois first explores in 1903 publication, “The Souls of Black Folk”. Double consciousness describes the individual sensation of feeling as though your identity is divided into several parts, making it difficult or impossible to have one unified identity.

     

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  • PTSD

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 12/4/2018

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may arise when people experience a traumatic event such as death, threatened death, serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence.* 

    This definition applies primarily to simple trauma, or exposure to one circumscribed traumatic event. By contrast, complex trauma may arise from exposure over time to prolonged, repeated trauma, such as physical or sexual abuse, neglect, or violence. The symptom pictures resulting from simple and complex trauma differ somewhat.

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  • Disability

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 10/2/2018

    Disablity- a physical or mental condition that limits a person's movements, senses, or activities.

     

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  • Hispanic, Latino, LatinX

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/5/2018

    Hispanic- those who trace their ancestry to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and the Spanish-speaking countries of Central and South America.

     

    Hispanic or Latino? While the two terms are sometimes used interchangeably, "Hispanic" is a narrower term that only refers to persons of Spanish-speaking origin or ancestry, while "Latino" is more frequently used to refer generally to anyone of Latin American origin or ancestry, including Brazilians.

     

    Latin X- Pronounced “La-teen-ex,” Latinx is a gender-neutral term for people of Latin American heritage. By dropping the traditional –o or –a ending at the end of the root word ‘Latin,’ Latinx encompasses those who identify outside of the gender binary, such as transgender people or those who are gender-fluid

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  • Middle Passage

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 8/13/2018

    Middle Passage: Middle Passage, the forced voyage of enslaved Africans across the Atlantic Ocean to the New World. It was one leg of the triangular trade route that took goods (such as knives, guns, ammunition, cotton cloth, tools, and brass dishes) from Europe to Africa, Africans to work as slaves in the Americas.

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  • Eviction

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 7/6/2018

    Eviction: the action of expelling someone, especially a tenant, from a property; expulsion:"the forced eviction of residents"

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  • LGBTQIA

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 6/8/2018

    LGBTQIA. Initialism of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex, and allies. Initialism of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex, and asexual.

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  • Apartheid

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 5/7/2018

     

    Apartheid- (in South Africa) a policy or system of segregation or discrimination on grounds of race.

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  • "At Risk"

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 4/5/2018

    “At risk”- The term at-risk is often used to describe students or groups of students who are considered to have a higher probability of failing academically or dropping out of school. (not a preferred way to describe students)

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  • Great Migration

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 3/7/2018

    Great Migration

    The Great Migration was the mass movement of about five million southern blacks to the north and west between 1915 and 1960.  During the initial wave the majority of migrants moved to major northern cities such as Chicago, Illiniois, Detroit, Michigan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and New York, New York.  By World War II the migrants continued to move North but many of them headed west to Los Angeles, Oakland, San Francisco, California, Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington.

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