Emergency Preparedness Blog

  • September Drill of the Month: FIRE DRILL

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 9/4/2019 10:50:00 AM
    • Team Shoreline,
    • We've done Fire Drills many times.  But the first time we are using Google Docs for our Drill Reporting (see link below).  So "winning" this month is now as easy as 2-Steps!
    • 1.  Principals (i.e. Incident Command) read the procedures for "Fire or Fire Alarm" in the SSD Emergency Preparedness Manual (page 60) and have your Staff read the "Fire or Fire Alarm Procedure" from their classroom Emergency Flip Chart and review Classroom Evacuation Route on wall in their classroom.

      2.  Conduct a Fire Drill and go to the Google Docs link (see 9/4/19 email from me). Fill-in the 2019-20 SSD Drill Reporting Form and hit "SEND." The filled-out Form will automatically come back to me and I will record it in Rapid Responder.

      For extra emergency preparedness: Since this is the First month of the new school year, consider conducting 2 Fire Drills to better familiarize your new students and staff to your Building's evacuation route(s) and Student Assembly Area.

    -------

    Standardizing Drills improve our Overall Effectiveness in Teaching Kids!

    Chuck Goodwin

    Safety/Emergency Preparedness Coordinator

    18560 1st Ave NE

    Shoreline, WA 98155

    Ph: 206.393.4237

     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Comments (0)
  • June Drill of the Month: EARTHQUAKE

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 6/1/2019 12:05:00 AM

    Team Shoreline,

    With June leading to summer break, getting your Building to conduct an Earthquake Drill this month is a good way to remind students and staff we live in earthquake country and what to do in the event of an earthquake.

    Earthquake DRILL:

    Make the following announcement:

    "At this time we are conducting an Earthquake Drill.

    I repeat, this is an Earthquake Drill.

    Drop, Cover and Hold and follow your teacher's further instructions."


    1. Have students do the following:

    a. Drop under a desk with backside facing any windows or glass.

    b. With one hand holding the desk leg.

    c. The other hand covering the back of their neck.


    2. Next, have teacher give the following instructions to students:

    "If this were a real earthquake, we would remain in our "Drop, Cover and Hold" position for 5-6 minutes

    while waiting for any aftershocks.  Next, we would then wait for instructions from the Front Office.  We

    would be told to remain in our classroom or evacuate."


    NOTE: Where students cannot drop under a desk (e.g. Gym Class):

    a. Have students drop to ground next to walls (backside to windows).

    b. Both hands covering the back of their neck.


    For additional information, check out the Great Washington Shakeout website for lots of resources at: Great Washington Shakeout


    Response During an ACTUAL Earthquake:

    • If outdoors get in an open area away from trees, power lines, etc.

    • If indoors DROP, COVER, AND HOLD onto something stable

    • Put backsides toward windows or glass, cover back of head & eyes

    • Wait for aftershocks (which may occur after 5-6 minutes)

    • Evacuation should NEVER be automatic

    • Wait for building condition to be examined by Custodial Staff

    • If building is unsafe, you will be told to evacuate

    • Refer to Evacuation page in the Emergency Flip Chart

     

    EVACUATION ISSUES (Should evacuation be necessary)

    • Your primary Evacuation Route may not be clear

    • Inspect exits to make sure debris is not hanging over exits

    • The lighting inside your building or room will probably be out - it may be DARK

    • Evacuate cautiously aftershocks can collapse a weakened structure

    Comments (0)
  • May Drill of the Month: MAPPING SYSTEM

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 5/8/2019 12:05:00 AM

    At least one drill each year must make use of the school mapping system (Rapid Responder).  The intent is principals and/or other administrators will access the mapping system to increase familiarity with the system and its' use in emergent situations.  For the purpose of meeting the requirements of the law, information stored in the school mapping system should be accessed and integrated during the drill.

    Option #1
    If you and your Team simply view my "Rapid_Responder_Navigation" PowerPoint and successfully logon to Rapid Responder, that qualifies for the Mapping Drill requirement!

    Option #2
    Conduct an evacuation drill based on a gas-leak scenario and use the information in the Rapid Responder system to locate the gas shut-off valves.  Assign personnel to locate the valves and simulate shutting them down, while concurrently evacuating the school (building) to outside assembly area.

    Option #3
    Conduct a fire evacuation drill based on a fire in a specific area of the school building. Use the information in the Rapid Responder system to assess potential hazards in the vicinity of the fire (e.g., hazardous materials or gas lines), and respond appropriately.

    Option #4
    Conduct a regular LockDown drill for a hostile intruder (locking down in classrooms).  While students are in LockDown have Front Office Staff access Rapid Responder to view layout of school map and classrooms and "table top exercise" assisting First Responders planning to evacuate students to an offsite location for reunification.  This may include locating transportation loading zone(s), and how best to stage students for transportation as they are released from their classrooms.


    For any of the 4 options you choose for your Building, if you have any issues/questions that arise, including: "How do I access Rapid Responder Mapping System?" or "I lost my password" email Chuck Goodwin, Safety/Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, or call him at ext. 4237.

    Comments (0)
  • April Drill of the Month: LOCKOUT outside classroom/building

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 4/1/2019 12:05:00 AM

    Procedures for conducting a LOCKOUT drill are not posted on our website.  Instead, I will be emailing procedures to Principals, Office Managers, Building Emergency Preparedness Leads, School Security and to our Community Parners at the Shoreline Police Department and Lake Forest Park Police Department.

    Questions?  Please don't hesitate to ask!

    --
    Standardizing Drills means safer schools -- which leads to increased learning!

    Chuck Goodwin

    Safety/Emergency Preparedness Coordinator
    Shoreline School District
    18560 1st Ave NE
    Shoreline, WA 98155
    ph: 206.393.4237

    Comments (0)
  • March Drill of the Month: FIRE DRILL

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 3/7/2019 10:00:00 AM

    Team Shoreline:

    We've done this drill many times, so "winning" this month should be as easy as 1, 2, 3.

    1.  Principals (i.e. Incident Command) read the procedures for "Fire or Fire Alarm" in the SSD Emergency Preparedness Manual (page 60) and have your Staff read the "Fire or Fire Alarm Procedure" from their classroom Emergency Flip Chart.

    2.  Conduct a Fire Drill and complete the Drill Record Form:

    • Side 1 - Drill Conditions: participation, statistics, weather and problems encountered.
    • Side 2 - Drill Checklist: for evaluating Drill effectiveness.

    3.  Place your Drill Record Form in District Mail / or Scan & Email to me so I can record it in Rapid Responder.

    For extra emergency preparedness: Have a section of your Building use an alternate evacuation route to simulate a potential barrier to the Student Assembly Area.

    -------

    Standardizing Drills means safer schools -- which leads to increased learning!

    Chuck Goodwin
    Safety/Emergency Preparedness Coordinator
    Shoreline School District
    18560 1st Ave NE
    Shoreline, WA 98155
    ph: 206.393.4237
    Comments (0)
  • February Drill of the Month: LOCKDOWN

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 2/1/2019 12:05:00 AM

    Procedures for conducting a LOCKDOWN drill are not posted on our website.  Instead, I will be emailing procedures to Principals, Office Managers, School Security and to our Community Parners at the Shoreline Police Department and Lake Forest Park Police Department.

    Also, I will include a short age-appropriate PowerPoint Presentation on LOCKDOWNS for:

    • Elementary grade-levels
    • Middle and High School grade-levels

    Questions?  Please don't hesitate to ask!

    --
    Standardizing Drills means safer schools -- which leads to increased learning!

    Chuck Goodwin

    Safety/Emergency Preparedness Coordinator
    Shoreline School District
    18560 1st Ave NE
    Shoreline, WA 98155
    ph: 206.393.4237

    Comments (0)
  • January Drill of the Month: SHELTER-IN-PLACE

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 1/7/2019 7:00:00 AM

    Team Shoreline,

     

    Conducting a Shelter-In-Place Drill

    The question has come up on "How are we supposed to conduct a Shelter-In-Place Drill?” To begin with, refer to the SSD ‘Emergency Preparedness Manual’ (pages 75-76) and the ‘Emergency Flip Chart.’  But for those who want a simple answer, you'll find below 5 steps to conduct a Shelter-In-Place drill

    But before we look these 5 steps, let's remind ourselves of the twofold purpose of Shelter-In-Place:

    a)  Shelter‐in‐Place can be for a weather-related events (e.g. sudden snowstorm) where students need to remain at school beyond school hours. 

    b)  Shelter-in-Place also has the purpose of protecting students and staff from airborne chemical, radiological, or biological contaminants released into the environment.  In the later, “Shelter‐in‐Place” means to take immediate shelter where you are and isolate your inside air-environment from the outside air-environment. 

     

    NOTE: For the purposes of January's Drill, we will only be sheltering for a weather-related event

     

    5 Steps to Conduct a Shelter-in-Place Drill

    1. Principal communicates following announcement:

    This is a drill only.  Shelter-in-Place.  Staff & Students go to your Shelter Room.”

    "Again, this is a drill only.  Shelter-in-Place.  Staff & Students go to your Shelter Room.”

          2.  Have Staff and Students quietly walk to (or remain in) the Shelter Room (classroom, gymnasium or cafeteria)

          3.  Take attendance and email attendance to Main Office

          4.  Principal communicates:

    “This concludes our Shelter-in-Place Drill.  If this were a real incident, we would wait until Police or Fire Personnel gave us instructions on what to do next.  Once again, this concludes our Shelter-in-Place Drill.”

           5. Complete the Drill Reporting Form and send it to me in District Mail / or Email it to me so I can record it in Rapid Responder.

    Questions??  Please don't hesitate to ask!


    --
    Standardizing Drills means safer schools -- which leads to increased learning!

    Comments (0)
  • December Drill of the Month: FIRE DRILL

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 11/30/2018 11:55:00 PM

    Team Shoreline:

    We've done this drill many times, so "winning" this month should be as easy as 1, 2, 3.

    1.  Principals (i.e. Incident Command) read the procedures for "Fire or Fire Alarm" in the SSD Emergency Preparedness Manual (page 60) and have your Staff read the "Fire or Fire Alarm Procedure" from their classroom Emergency Flip Chart.

    2.  Conduct a Fire Drill and complete the Drill Record Form:

    • Side 1 - Drill Conditions: participation, statistics, weather and problems encountered.
    • Side 2 - Drill Checklist: for evaluating Drill effectiveness.

    3.  Place your Drill Record Form in District Mail / or Scan & Email to me so I can record it in Rapid Responder.

    For extra emergency preparedness: Have a section of your Building use an alternate evacuation route to simulate a potential barrier to the Student Assembly Area.

    -------

    Standardizing Drills means safer schools -- which leads to increased learning!

    Chuck Goodwin
    Safety/Emergency Preparedness Coordinator
    Shoreline School District
    18560 1st Ave NE
    Shoreline, WA 98155
    ph: 206.393.4237
    Comments (0)
  • November Drill of the Month: LOCKDOWN

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 11/1/2018 12:05:00 AM

    Shoreline Schools does not publicly post District procedures for Lockdowns for security purposes.  But suffice to say that starting in 2011, SSD has taken broadscale measures to secure our schools, both inside and out, with cardkey entries to buildings and quick-action locks - similiar to the ones described in the article below -  on classroom doors.  While we've also taken additional measures, just these actions alone have resulted in schools that are far more safer and secure for students and staff.

    There are no guarantees Shoreline Schools won't ever experience something as tragic as a shooting at one of our schools, but we can all be confident that we have lessened the likelihood -- and significantly reduced the impact.

    What follows is a recent article from Campus Safety that reinforces our view that when it comes to making schools more secure we must start with, and build upon, the tried and true basics:

    Simple Locks Can Be the Most Effective Solution for Active Shooter Prevention. 

    As everyone scrambles for complex active shooter solutions, officials should consider the ones that have been effective in the past.

    School Halls

    July 09, 2018 by Art Kirkland

    After a workplace violence event, especially an active shooter event, we inevitably see a series of stories about new technologies or inventions designed to keep people safe. This is even more evident if the incident involves a school.

    These devices run the gamut from very simple suggestions (my favorite of the last batch was telling people to carry a door stop in their bag) to the more complicated, like door blockading devices, to the extreme, which can lock doors, activate alarms and start cameras from a single button.

    I would advocate to start simply, and perhaps staying simple is the best approach to security in a school violence situation.

    One piece of information to come out of the Sandy Hook investigation is that no violent intruder has ever entered a locked classroom. This makes inherent sense given that violent intruder events usually end very quickly.

    Unless an intruder has a specific target in mind and knows their location, it is highly unlikely that they will make more than a cursory effort to enter a room. This is borne out by the after-action reviews of school active shooting events. Even doors which could not be locked, but were instead barricaded, have prevented casualties inside.

    Given this fact, a simple door lock would appear to be not only the most cost-effective device for preventing casualties during a violent intruder event, but also a 100 percent effective solution when used in the past.

    Notice, that I said a “simple door lock.” By this I mean literally a deadbolt type lock with a knob that turns to lock. If this is integrated into the door in such a way that the normal door operation also unlocks the deadbolt, the solution is effective without violating life safety codes and can be implemented by anyone in the classroom.

    These two statements are very important. Most of the door barricade devices available violate life safety code in that they require someone to remove the device before they can open the door.

    The code requires that doors open with a single motion and require no tools. Many people argue that violating the life safety code is a minor concern, especially considering the number of students killed by violent intruders versus the number killed by fires. However, students aren’t killed by fires in large part because of the life safety code. This approach literally increases one risk while not substantially reducing the risk of a violent intruder.

    Several studies have noted that there are substantial delays in locking down a classroom (on the order of 30 seconds to a minute and a half) when a keyed deadbolt lock is used. These delays are attributed to the fact that the teacher has to be the one to lock the door. They have to recognize the emergency, find the key and then lock the door all while under considerable stress.

    The familiar, simple act of putting a key in a lock and turning it becomes quite complex. This situation would only be amplified when applied to an unfamiliar device undoubtedly stored in an unobtrusive space that probably only the teacher knows how to use and has practiced with once.

    Simple locks are not the total answer for security, of course. In fact, they are almost the last line of defense.

    There are other problems. Many school doors have glass in or near the door which would allow an intruder to reach in and turn a simple turn-bolt. In these cases, a keyed deadbolt may be the best interim solution until the glass is replaced.  There are also crash-bar doors, for which these simple locks won’t work. However, there are similar solutions for those doors.

    After a shooting incident at UCLA in 2016, we retrofit all of our classroom doors with locks that lock with the simple push of a button. There were challenges, some of which I described above, but we currently have a system that allows anyone in the classroom to lock the door in an emergency as quickly as they can reach it. At the same time, the door can be readily opened by First Responders when they arrive.

    Security is good. Technology is good. New ideas are good. However, sometimes the best solutions are simple, old, and have been right in front of our faces all along.

    Art Kirkland is the Director, Office of Emergency Management at UCLA in Los Angeles, Ca. He previously served in the same position at Tulane University in New Orleans. He has worked for numerous institutions as both a faculty and staff member including the US Military Academy and the US Army’s Command and General Staff College.

    Hope you enjoyed the good read.

    Chuck Goodwin
    Safety/Emergency Preparedness Coordinator
    Shoreline School District
    18560 1st Ave NE
    Shoreline, WA 98155
    ph: 206.393.4237

     

    Comments (0)
  • October Drill of the Month: EARTHQUAKE

    Posted by Chuck Goodwin on 10/2/2018 10:00:00 AM

    Team Shoreline,

    With October being the month for the Great Washington Shakeout getting your Building to conduct an Earthquake Drill on Thursday, October 18 at 10:18am just got easier!

    Earthquake DRILL:

    At 10:18am on Thursday, October 18 make an all school announcement:

    "At this time we are conducting an Earthquake Drill.

    I repeat, this is an Earthquake Drill.

    Drop, Cover and Hold and follow your teacher's further instructions."


    1. Have students do the following:

    a. Drop under a desk with backside facing any windows or glass.

    b. With one hand holding the desk leg.

    c. The other hand covering the back of their neck.


    2. Next, have teacher give the following instructions to students:

    "If this were a real earthquake, we would remain in our "Drop, Cover and Hold" position for 5-6 minutes

    while waiting for any aftershocks.  Next, we would then wait for instructions from the Front Office.  We

    would be told to remain in our classroom or evacuate."


    NOTE: Where students cannot drop under a desk (e.g. Gym Class):

    a. Have students drop to ground next to walls (backside to windows).

    b. Both hands covering the back of their neck.


    For additional information, check out the Great Washington Shakeout website for lots of resources at: Great Washington Shakeout


    Response During an ACTUAL Earthquake:

    • If outdoors get in an open area away from trees, power lines, etc.

    • If indoors DROP, COVER, AND HOLD onto something stable

    • Put backsides toward windows or glass, cover back of head & eyes

    • Wait for aftershocks (which may occur after 5-6 minutes)

    • Evacuation should NEVER be automatic

    • Wait for building condition to be examined by Custodial Staff

    • If building is unsafe, you will be told to evacuate

    • Refer to Evacuation page in the Emergency Flip Chart

     

    EVACUATION ISSUES (Should evacuation be necessary)

    • Your primary Evacuation Route may not be clear

    • Inspect exits to make sure debris is not hanging over exits

    • The lighting inside your building or room will probably be out - it may be DARK

    • Evacuate cautiously aftershocks can collapse a weakened structure

    Comments (0)