LGBTQIA+ Student and Family Resources

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     2021 Gender Identity and Gender Expression for Shoreline School District

    Gender Inclusive Registration Form

    Shoreline Schools is committed to recognizing the rich diversity of our students. This form is used only at the request of students/and or families. If you have any questions about any of the information we are collecting, please don't hesitate to discuss with us. Please note that this will be used for school internal use and can be used for SIS, but documentation must be submitted for any legal name changes to be reflected on official documentation. 

     

     

    Help Me See Myself (a resource by Shorewood Grad Sam Ayers)

     

     

    With the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice's recent rescinding of prior guidance requiring schools to treat students "consistent with the student’s gender identity," we have received questions about its impact on our school community. 

    While the federal guidance has been rescinded, Washington state law continues to protect transgender students from discrimination in school, which includes names and pronouns, dress codes, student participation in sports and physical education, harassment, and students' use of restrooms and locker rooms. The federal guidance will not affect state law.

    In 2006, sexual orientation and gender identity were added as protected classes to the Washington State Law Against Discrimination (WLAD). Four years later, the Legislature passed a law (codified as Revised Code of Washington 28A.642) explicitly protecting students in Washington public schools against discrimination.

    As a result of that law, OSPI in February 2012 issued formal guidelines entitled, “Prohibiting Discrimination in Washington Public Schools.” The guidelines specifically address access to restrooms and locker rooms:

    • On restrooms: “School districts should allow students to use the restroom that is consistent with their gender identity consistently asserted at school” (p. 30);
    • On locker rooms: “No student … should be required to use a locker room that conflicts with his or her gender identity” (p. 31).

    School districts are required to comply with the guidelines – and have been doing so successfully for five years. The new guidance from the Education and Justice Departments states that “there must be due regard for the primary role of the States and local school districts in establishing educational policy.” In short, our state laws continue to protect our transgender students.

    Shoreline Schools will follow the state's laws and guidance as outlined above and will continue to provide every student and family who walk through our doors with a safe and positive learning environment. Shoreline Schools benefits from a diverse learning environment that respects and embraces all cultures, customs and identities.

    You can read our Nondiscrimination Policy and Procedure as well as our Prohibition of Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying/CyberBullying Policy and Procedure.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact your school's office.

Resources

Immigration Status and Student Rights

  • Advocacy Tool kit for P-12 Educators, Leaders and Policy makers 

    DACA  Resources:

    Families affected or impacted can call NWIRP to talk with a specialist regarding DACA.  The Seattle office number is 1-855-313-7326.   
     
    For more specifics, please review the following resources:
     
     
     

    In light of recent executive orders and court challenges pertaining to immigration and travel, we have received questions about their impact on our schools and families. State Superintendent, Chris Reykdal, notes in his letter to all Washington school districts, "Our state’s public education system exists to help our students learn. It does not function, nor will it function, as an arm of federal immigration services. OSPI is committed to our state’s constitutional requirement that students are to be educated “without distinction or preference on account of race, color, caste, or sex.” 

    Shoreline Schools will follow the state's guidance outlined below and will continue to provide every student and family who walk through our doors with a safe and positive learning environment. Shoreline Schools benefits from a diverse learning environment that respects and embraces all cultures, customs and identities.

    You can read our Nondiscrimination Policy and Procedure as well as our Prohibition of Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying/CyberBullying Policy and Procedure.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact your school's office.

     

    The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction has recently received questions from schools and districts about their responsibility regarding collecting and releasing the immigration status of their students. Below are some general guidelines we hope answers some of those questions.

    The most relevant U.S. Supreme Court case is Plyler v. Doe, from 1982. In Plyler, the Court ruled that undocumented students have the same right to attend public schools as U.S. citizens and permanent residents. As a result of the ruling, public schools:

    • May not deny admission to a student during initial enrollment or at any other time on the basis of immigration status.
    • May not treat a student differently to determine residency.
    • May not engage in any practices that might have a “chilling effect” on school enrollment.
    • May not require students or parents to disclose or document their immigration status, including Social Security numbers.
    • May not make inquiries of students or parents that may expose their undocumented status. Examples include asking for a student’s status when enrolling the student as an English learner or when enrolling for free or reduced-price meals.

    Some information – such as a student’s race, ethnicity and address (if the student is not homeless) – is collected. But the student’s personal information cannot be disclosed to the public, nor can it be used to deny enrollment.

    In addition to federal law, Washington state law contains a chapter (Revised Code of Washington 28A.642), which prohibits discrimination, including discrimination based on national origin.

    Our state’s public education system exists to help our students learn. It does not function, nor will it function, as an arm of federal immigration services. OSPI is committed to our state’s constitutional requirement that students are to be educated “without distinction or preference on account of race, color, caste, or sex.”

    OSPI will soon be updating our web site – www.k12.wa.us – with more information, which will be translated into different languages. Please feel free to share this with parents.

    Additional resources:

     

    Thanks for all the work you do to support our students,

    Chris Reykdal

    Superintendent of Public Instruction

     

    Recientemente, la Oficina del Superintendente de Instrucción Pública recibió preguntas de las escuelas y distritos acerca de su responsabilidad con respecto a la recolección y liberación del estatus migratorio de sus estudiantes. A continuación se presentan algunas directrices generales que esperamos respuestas a algunas de esas preguntas.

    El caso más relevante del Tribunal Supremo de los Estados Unidos es Plyler v. Doe, de 1982. En Plyler, la Corte dictaminó que los estudiantes indocumentados tienen el mismo derecho a asistir a las escuelas públicas como ciudadanos estadounidenses y residentes permanentes. Como resultado de la decisión, las escuelas públicas:

     No puede negar la admisión a un estudiante durante la inscripción inicial o en cualquier otro momento en base al estatus migratorio.
     No puede tratar a un estudiante de manera diferente para determinar la residencia.  No puede participar en ninguna práctica que pueda tener un "efecto escalofriante" en la inscripción escolar.
     No puede requerir que los estudiantes o padres revelen o documenten su estado migratorio, incluyendo números de Seguro Social.
     No puede hacer preguntas a los estudiantes o padres que puedan exponer su situación de indocumentado. Ejemplos incluyen solicitar el estatus de un estudiante al inscribir al estudiante como estudiante de inglés o al inscribirse para comidas gratis oa precio reducido.

    Se colecta cierta información, como la raza, etnia y dirección del estudiante (si el estudiante no está sin hogar). Pero la información personal del estudiante no puede ser revelada al público, ni puede usarse para negar la inscripción.

    Además de la ley federal, la ley estatal de Washington contiene un capítulo (Código Revisado de Washington 28A.642), que prohíbe la discriminación, incluida la discriminación basada en el origen nacional.

    El sistema de educación pública de nuestro estado existe para ayudar a nuestros estudiantes a aprender. No funciona, ni funcionará, como una rama de los servicios federales de inmigración. OSPI está comprometido con el requisito constitucional de nuestro estado de que los estudiantes deben ser educados "sin distinción ni preferencia por raza, color, casta o sexo".

    OSPI estará pronto actualizando nuestro sitio web - www.k12.wa.us- con más información, que será traducida a diferentes idiomas. Por favor, siéntase libre de compartir esto con los padres. Recursos adicionales:
     Directrices sobre la prohibición de la discriminación: http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/pubdocs/ProhibitingDiscriminationInPublicSchools.pdf
     Protección de los datos de los estudiantes: http://www.k12.wa.us/DataAdmin/DataSharing/default.aspx
     Ley Federal de Derechos Educativos y Privacidad (FERPA-inglés): https://ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html

    Gracias por todo el trabajo que hacen para apoyar a nuestros estudiantes,
    Chris Reykdal
    Superintendente de Instrucción Pública