Social Justice Library

  • Between the World and Me

    by Coates Year Published: 2015 Narratives

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • Entertainment Weekly • Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly

    Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (The New York Observer)


    “This is your country, this is your world, this is your body, and you must find some way to live within the all of it.”

    In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?

    Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward.

    Praise for Between the World and Me

    “I’ve been wondering who might fill the intellectual void that plagued me after James Baldwin died. Clearly it is Ta-Nehisi Coates. The language of Between the World and Me, like Coates’s journey, is visceral, eloquent, and beautifully redemptive. And its examination of the hazards and hopes of black male life is as profound as it is revelatory.”—Toni Morrison

    “Powerful and passionate . . . profoundly moving . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

    “Really powerful and emotional.”—John Legend, The Wall Street Journal

    “Extraordinary.”—David Remnick, The New Yorker

    “Brilliant . . . a mature writer entirely consumed by a momentous subject and working at the extreme of his considerable powers.”The Washington Post

    “An eloquent blend of history, reportage, and memoir.”The Boston Globe

    “[Coates] speaks resolutely and vividly to all of black America.”Los Angeles Times

    “A work that’s both titanic and timely . . . the latest essential reading in America’s social canon.”Entertainment Weekly

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  • Black Male(d)

    by Howard Year Published: 2014 Teaching Diverse Students

    'Black Male(d) is a timely, masterfully crafted contribution to an important conversation about one of our nation's most misunderstood populations. Anyone who is troubled by the status of Black boys in schools and society will find much that is useful in this book. The author's brilliance is apparent and praiseworthy.''
    -- Shaun R. Harper, Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education, University of Pennsylvania

    ''This book pushes educators to not only know more but to do more on behalf of Black males. This is the book that shows us how to reform practices, policies, and places in order to improve the human condition of Black males. Howard reminds us all that we absolutely must do better--our children s lives depend on it!''-- H. Richard Milner IV, Helen Faison Endowed Chair of Urban Education, University of Pittsburgh

    In his new book, the author of the bestseller Why Race and Culture Matter in Schools examines the chronic under-performance of African American males in U.S. schools. Citing a plethora of disturbing academic outcomes for Black males, this book focuses on the historical, structural, educational, psychological, emotional, and cultural factors that influence the teaching and learning process for this student population. Howard discusses the potential and promise of Black males by highlighting their voices to generate new insights, create new knowledge, and identify useful practices that can significantly improve the schooling experiences and life chances of Black males. Howard calls for a paradigm shift in how we think about, teach, and study Black males.

    Book Features:
    * Examines current structures, ideologies, and practices that both help and hinder the educational and social prospects of Black males.
    * Translates frequently cited theoretical principles into research-based classroom practice.
    * Documents teacher-student interactions, student viewpoints, and discusses the troubling role that sports plays in the lives of many Black males.
    * Highlights voices and perspectives from Black male students about ways to improve their schooling experiences and outcomes.
    * Identifies community-based programs that are helping Black males succeed.

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  • Blind Spot

    by Banaji and Greenwald Year Published: 2013 Stereotype and Bias

    "I know my own mind.
    I am able to assess others in a fair and accurate way."

    These self-perceptions are challenged by leading psychologists Mahzarin R. Banaji and Anthony G. Greenwald as they explore the hidden biases we all carry from a lifetime of exposure to cultural attitudes about age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, social class, sexuality, disability status, and nationality.

    “Blindspot” is the authors’ metaphor for the portion of the mind that houses hidden biases. Writing with simplicity and verve, Banaji and Greenwald question the extent to which our perceptions of social groups―without our awareness or conscious control―shape our likes and dislikes and our judgments about people’s character, abilities, and potential.

    In Blindspot, the authors reveal hidden biases based on their experience with the Implicit Association Test, a method that has revolutionized the way scientists learn about the human mind and that gives us a glimpse into what lies within the metaphoric blindspot.

    The book’s “good people” are those of us who strive to align our behavior with our intentions. The aim of Blindspot is to explain the science in plain enough language to help well-intentioned people achieve that alignment. By gaining awareness, we can adapt beliefs and behavior and “outsmart the machine” in our heads so we can be fairer to those around us. Venturing into this book is an invitation to understand our own minds.

    Brilliant, authoritative, and utterly accessible, Blindspot is a book that will challenge and change readers for years to come.

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  • Brain Rules

    by Medina Year Published: 2008 Social Emotional
    Most of us have no idea what’s really going on inside our heads. Yet brain scientists have uncovered details every business leader, parent, and teacher should know—like the need for physical activity to get your brain working its best.

    How do we learn? What exactly do sleep and stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking a myth? Why is it so easy to forget—and so important to repeat new knowledge? Is it true that men and women have different brains?

    In Brain Rules, Dr. John Medina, a molecular biologist, shares his lifelong interest in how the brain sciences might influence the way we teach our children and the way we work. In each chapter, he describes a brain rule—what scientists know for sure about how our brains work—and then offers transformative ideas for our daily lives.

    Medina’s fascinating stories and infectious sense of humor breathe life into brain science. You’ll learn why Michael Jordan was no good at baseball. You’ll peer over a surgeon’s shoulder as he proves that most of us have a Jennifer Aniston neuron. You’ll meet a boy who has an amazing memory for music but can’t tie his own shoes.

    You will discover how:

    Every brain is wired differently
    Exercise improves cognition
    We are designed to never stop learning and exploring
    Memories are volatile
    Sleep is powerfully linked with the ability to learn
    Vision trumps all of the other senses
    Stress changes the way we learn
    In the end, you’ll understand how your brain really works—and how to get the most out of it.
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  • Changing the Faces of Mathematics: Latinos

    by Secada Year Published: 2005 Instructaional Practices
    This book focuses on a number of salient research and practice issues in the teaching and learning of mathematics among the second largest minority group in the United States, Latinos. Chapters include: (1) "Understanding the Needs of Latino Students in Reform-Oriented Mathematics Classrooms" (Judit N. Moschkovich); (2) "Latinos, Income, and Mathematics Achievement: Beating the Odds" (Luis Ortiz-Franco); (3) "Isn't English a Trip?" (Jose Franco); (4) "Spanish-English Language Issues in the Mathematics Classroom" (Pilar Ron); (5) "Adapting Mathematics Instruction for English-Language Learners: The Language-Concept Connection" (Leslie Garrison and Jill Kerper Mora); (6) "The Mathematics-Bilingual Education Connection: Two Lessons" (Norma G. Hernandez); (7) "Mathematizing Children's Stories, Helping Children Solve Word Problems, and Supporting Parental Involvement" (Ana Maria Lo Cicero, Karen C. Fuson, Martha Allexsaht-Snider); (8) "Challenging Conventional Wisdom: A Case Study" (Lena Licon Khisty); (9) "Teachers and Students' Attitudes toward the Use of Manipulatives in Two Predominantly Latino School Districts" (Maria L. Bustamante and Betty Travis); (10) "Portafolio de Matematica: Using Mathematics Portfolios with Latino Students" (Leslie Garrison); (11) "Taking on the Challenge of Mathematics for All" (Richard G. Doty, Susan Mercer, and Marjorie A. Henningsen); (12) "Staff Development to Foster Latino Students' Success in Mathematics: Insights from Constructivism" (Gary Ivory, Dolores R. Chaparro, and Stanley Ball); (13) "TexPREP and Proyecto Access: Making Mathematics Work for Minorities" (Julio Guillen and Manuel P. Berriozabal); (14) "The Minority Mathematics and Science Education Cooperative (MMSEC) Success Story" (Olga M. Ramirez and John E. Bernard); (15) "A Model of Tutoring that Helps Students Gain Access to Mathematical Competence" (Yolanda De La Cruz); and (16) "There's More to Mathematics Than Choosing the Letter C: The Limitations of Test-Driven Intervention" (Milagros M. Seda and Carmen M. Seda). (ASK)

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  • Courageous Conversations about Race

    by Singleton and Linton Year Published: 2006 Leading the Race Conversation
    "The beauty of this volume is that it is designed to help lay people―teachers, administrators, parents, community leaders, and even university professors―begin to engage in the emotionally and psychically difficult conversations about race. Glenn Singleton and Curtis Linton have offered us an important book that provides us with empirical data and well-constructed exercises to help us think through the ways that race affects our lives and our professional practices. My sincere desire is that after you have had an opportunity to read this volume you will, indeed, engage in some courageous conversations about race." (Gloria Ladson-Billings, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison 2005-03-07)

    "Challenges educators to talk in honest and open ways about race, and provides various tools to stimulate and inform the conversation. Singleton and Linton remind us that the achievement gap will not be eliminated until we learn to talk about race in ways that build bridges of understanding that lead to effective action." (Dennis Sparks, Executive Director 2005-08-09)

    "Given the sensitive issues of race in our nation, schools and school leaders need tools that can illuminate the concerns, guide the discussions, and generate momentum for growth and change.  This book provides the tools and resources needed to move from open dialogue to meaningful action that can make excellence and equity in schools a reality." (Monte C. Moses, Superintendent 2005-08-12)

    "Talking about race and its effect on academic achievement remains one of the most elusive conversations today. In their new book, Singleton and Linton help educators understand and engage in the discourse around race that affects the success of any curriculum, instructional methodology, or program implementation. The book's exercises and prompts assists school and district leadership teams in articulating those innate behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes that impair our ability to be effective in closing the racial achievement gap. I am encouraged to know that educators will be empowered and supported as we develop our personal capacity to address one of the most crucial elements of our society: the education of our children." (Yvette M. Irving, Principal 2005-09-06)

    "This is an important book that challenges one to think critically about the effects of race and student achievement. It is an invitation to sustain a strong desire for fairness and equity for all children." (SMSG Newsletter 2005-12-29)

    "In an era when America seems content to sweep candid talk of race under the rug, Courageous Conversations About Race recognizes that denial isn’t a prescription for interracial tolerance and social progress. The authors provide thoughtful educators with innovative instructional tools to successfully navigate the most robustly diverse nation on earth." (Hugh B. Price, Former President and CEO 2006-01-05)

    "Singleton and Linton challenge educators to move beyond recognizing the existence of a racial achievement gap and to develop strategies to eliminate it." (Curriculum Connections, Fall 2006)
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  • Craft Lessons: Teaching Writing K-8

    by Fletcher and Portalupi Year Published: 1998 Instructional Strategies
    Since its publication in 1998 Craft Lessons has become a mainstay of writing teachers, both new and experienced. Readers value the pithy, practical lessons—each printed on one page—and appreciate the instructional language geared to three grade-level groupings: K–2, 3–4, and 5–8.

    In the decade since Craft Lessons' publication the world has changed in many ways, yet one thing has remained constant: teachers continue to feel starved for time. With new curriculum mandates, daily specials, “pull-outs, and precious time devoted to test preparation, the situation has never been worse, and the need for a succinct resource like Craft Lessons has never been greater.

    The features that made Craft Lessons so valuable have been augmented. This edition includes:

    • Seventeen brand new craft lessons; many based on veteran teachers' observations about typical student writing.
    • Revisions to other craft lessons: model texts that have gone out of print have been replaced with current titles, and the resource materials sections have been expanded.
    • New thinking about teaching elements of craft and the reading-writing connection.
    • Two new indexes: a handy subject index to make it easier to find specific craft lessons, and an index that shows how these craft lessons can be integrated into Ralph and JoAnn's curriculum resource on the “qualities of writing —Ideas, Design, Language, and Presentation.

    The 95 lessons in this book provide a wealth of information for teaching leads, character, endings, stronger verbs, and much more. This new edition reestablishes Craft Lessons as the crucial “desert island book for harried writing teachers everywhere.

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  • Creating the Opportunity to Learn

    by Boykin and Noguera Year Published: 2011 Instructional Practices

    "Unless we believe that those who have more are inherently superior to those who have less, we should be troubled by the fact that patterns of achievement are often fairly predictable, particularly with respect to students' race and class."

    In Creating the Opportunity to Learn, Wade Boykin and Pedro Noguera help navigate the turbid waters of evidence-based methodologies and chart a course toward closing (and eliminating) the academic achievement gap. Turning a critical eye to current and recent research, the authors present a comprehensive view of the achievement gap and advocate for strategies that contribute to the success of all children.

    Boykin and Noguera maintain that it is possible to close the achievement gap by abandoning failed strategies, learning from successful schools, and simply doing more of what the research shows is most effective. Success is founded on equity, but equity involves more than simply ensuring students have equal access to education; equity also entails a focus on outcomes and results.

    If we want to bring about significant improvements in those outcomes, we have to do more to address the context in which learning takes place. In short, we must create schools where a child’s race or class is no longer a predictor for how well he or she might perform.

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  • Culture and Power in the Classroom

    by Darder Year Published: 2012 Teaching Diverse Students
    This is a timely second edition of the enormously significant book which changed how teachers and community activists view their own practice. This edition concludes with personal essays by teachers, professors, and community activists explaining the direct impact which Culture and Power in the Classroom has had on their lives. Unlike many texts that discuss educational failure, this book provides a historical context for understanding underachievement in our nation. Thoroughly revised to include the new thinking on diversity and learning, this edition includes a new chapter on assessment and the brain. This second edition will be welcomed by previous and new readers alike, and will help influence the approach of a new generation of teachers, whether they are based in schools, colleges or community centres.
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  • Despite the Best Intentions

    by Lewis and Diamond Year Published: 2015 Instructional Strategies

    On the surface, Riverview High School looks like the post-racial ideal. Serving an enviably affluent, diverse, and liberal district, the school is well-funded, its teachers are well-trained, and many of its students are high-achieving. Yet Riverview has not escaped the same unrelenting question that plagues schools throughout America: why is it that even when all of the circumstances seem right, black and Latina/o students continue to lag behind their peers?

    Through five years' worth of interviews and data-gathering at Riverview, Amanda Lewis and John Diamond have created a powerful and illuminating study of how the racial achievement gap continues to afflict American schools more than fifty years after the formal dismantling of segregation. As students progress from elementary school to middle school to high school, their level of academic achievement increasingly tracks along racial lines, with white and Asian students maintaining higher GPAs and standardized testing scores, taking more advanced classes, and attaining better college admission results than their black and Latina/o counterparts. Most research to date has focused on the role of poverty, family stability, and other external influences in explaining poor performance at school, especially in urban contexts. Diamond and Lewis instead situate their research in a suburban school, and look at what factors within the school itself could be causing the disparity. Most crucially, they challenge many common explanations of the "racial achievement gap," exploring what race actually means in this situation, and how it matters.

    Diamond and Lewis' research brings clarity and data into a debate that is too often dominated by stereotyping, race-baiting, and demagoguery. An in-depth study with far-reaching consequences, Despite the Best Intentions revolutionizes our understanding of both the knotty problem of academic disparities and the larger question of the color line in American society.

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  • Educating Everybody's Children

    by Cole Year Published: 2008 Instructional Practices

    Designed to promote reflection, discussion, and action among the entire learning community, Educating Everybody's Children encapsulates what research has revealed about successfully addressing the needs of students from economically, ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse groups and identifies a wide range of effective principles and instructional strategies.

    Although good teaching works well with all students, educators must develop an extensive repertoire of instructional tools to meet the varying needs of students from diverse backgrounds. Those tools and the knowledge base behind them are the foundation of this expanded and revised second edition of Educating Everybody's Children. Each strategy discussed in the book includes classroom examples and a list of the research studies that support it.

    The most important thing we have learned as a result of the education reform movement is that student achievement stands or falls on the motivation and skills of teachers. We must ensure that all teachers are capable of delivering a standards-based curriculum that describes what students should know and be able to do, and that these standards are delivered by means of a rich and engaging "pedagogy of plenty." By these two acts we can ensure that all schools will be ready and able to educate everybody's children.

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  • Free the Children

    by Keilburger Year Published: 2010 Narratives

    Here is the dramatic and moving story of one child's transformation from a normal, middle-class kid from the suburbs to an activist, fighting against child labor on the world stage of international human rights.

    Making headlines around the globe, Graig Keilburger and his organization, Free the Children, which he founded at the age of twelve, have brought unprecedented attention to the worldwide abuse of children's rights. Free the Childrenis a passionate and astounding story and a moving testament to the power that children and young adults have to change the world, as witnessed through the achievements of one remarkable young man.

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  • From Rage to Hope

    by Kuykendall Year Published: 2004 Teaching Diverse Students
    This second edition, with a new foreword by Asa G. Hilliard III, is a compelling and informative examination of the academic underachievement, apathy, and rage among America s Black and Hispanic youth.
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  • How to Promote Children's Social and Emotional Competence

    by Webster-Stratton Year Published: 1999 Social Emotional
    This book shows how teachers can collaborate with parents in addressing children's educational and emotional needs, and presents a variety of classroom management strategies.
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  • I Love Me The Girl Guide

    by Fonseca Year Published: 2013 Instructional Stratgies
    Finding your unique voice in a noisy world can be hard--very hard. But not if you have a great guide! The Girl Guide: Finding Your Place in a Mixed-Up World is a must-read for girls in grades 6-8 as they enter the tumultuous world of adolescence. Packed with fun worksheets and quizzes, as well as stories from older girls and women, The Girl Guide covers everything a teenage girl needs to know on the journey toward her own identity. Proven strategies for dealing with stress management, confronting relational aggression, being safe online, navigating the changing mother-daughter relationship, and more make this the ultimate guide for any girl to get through the teen years and discover her unique point of view in the world.
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  • Instructional Rounds in Education

    by City, Elmore, Fiarman, Teitel Year Published: 2011 Instructional Strategies
    Instructional Rounds in Education is intended to help education leaders and practitioners develop a shared understanding of what high-quality instruction looks like and what schools and districts need to do to support it.

    Walk into any school in America and you will see adults who care deeply about their students and are doing the best they can every day to help students learn. But you will also see a high degree of variability among classrooms—much higher than in most other industrialized countries. Today we are asking schools to do something they have never done before—educate all students to high levels—yet we don’t know how to do that in every classroom for every child.

    Inspired by the medical-rounds model used by physicians, the authors have pioneered a new form of professional learning known as instructional rounds networks. Through this process, educators develop a shared practice of observing, discussing, and analyzing learning and teaching.
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  • Kids Explore America's African American Heritage

    by Westridge Young Writers Workshop Year Published: 1996 Teaching Diverse Learners
    Examines the contributions of African Americans to American culture in music, literature, food, and other fields, discussing the early history of Africa, the contributions of civil rights leaders, ethnic crafts, and more. Reprint.
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  • Leaving Children Behind

    by Valenzuela Year Published: 2005 Instructional Strategies
    Argues for a more valid and democratic approach to assessment and accountability.

    The federal government has based much of its education policies on those adopted in Texas. This book examines how "Texas-style" accountability—the notion that decisions governing retention, promotion, and graduation should be based on a single test score—fails Latina/o youth and their communities.
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  • Literacy and Biligualism

    by Brisk and Harrington Year Published: 2000 Language
    This handbook applies proven techniques, derived from bilingual/bicultural classrooms, to teaching literacy in the twenty-first century. Its goal is to help teachers increase their understanding of bilingual learners in order to maximize instruction. Teachers can use this handbook to expand their understanding of literacy and bilingualism; implement literacy approaches and assess students’ development; and learn through reflection. 
     
    Practical, flexible format and content. Complete and straightforward instructions, illustrated by case studies, allow teachers to use the strategies in this handbook on their own or in teacher-led study groups. They can select from the variety of approaches the ones which best match their students’ needs and their own teaching style. 
     
    Student-centered focus. All of the approaches share characteristics that help motivate students of varying language abilities to develop literacy.
     
    Field-tested approaches. The approaches have been modified and tested with bilingual students of different ages and language backgrounds in bilingual, ESL, mainstream, special education, and deaf education classes ranging from preschool through high school.
     
    New in the Second Edition: 
    *five new approaches with their corresponding classroom implementation;
    *additional information in each introduction addressing its theme;
    *new material on issues of language, culture, and literacy development of students completely new to the English language; and
    *annotated bibliographies with sample books to support literacy within language and content area classes.
     
    Literacy and Bilingualism is intended for a broad audience of teachers in any type of classroom where bilingualism plays a role, and is an excellent text for preservice and inservice courses that prepare teachers to work with English language learners.
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  • Made in America

    by Olsen Year Published: 1997 Teaching Diverse Students

    As the United States reexamines its borders and immigration policies, the debate over educating immigrant students in our public schools has divided Americans. What can teachers and immigrant students expect from each other? Laurie Olsen, director of a nationally recognized immigrant organization, describes what it looks and feels like to go to school and to teach in a culturally diverse environment.

    Made in America describes Madison High, a prototypical public high school, where more than 20 percent of students were born in another country and more than a third speak limited English or come from homes in which English is not spoken. Through interviews with teachers, administrators, students, and parents, Olsen explores such issues as the complexities of bilingual education and the difficulties of dating for students already promised in marriage at birth.

    In the words of Teacher Magazine, “Olsen’s message is clear: celebrating diversity is fine, but it’s no substitute for giving all students a real chance at school success.” With a new introduction stressing the importance of advocacy for immigrant students in a climate of increasing exclusion, Made in America will help a new generation of educators recognize the impact that immigration has on their schools.

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  • Many Families, Many Literacies

    by Taylor Year Published: 1997 Language
    At a time when family literacy policies and practices are confusingly fragmented and often deficit driven, Many Families, Many Literacies provides much-needed guidance on developing policies and practices that build on the strengths that families bring to any learning situation: their diverse languages, literacies, and complex problem-solving capabilities.

    Many Families, Many Literacies reclaims family literacy from the family literacy movement and asserts that society constructs the conditions of poverty in which many minority families are forced to live. It represents the opinions of forty-nine leading education experts and family literacy practitioners, including Lucille Fandel, Ken Goodman, Yetta Goodman, David Barton, Audrey N. Grant, Klaudia Rivera, Judith Kalman, Letta Matsiepe Mashishi, and many others.

    This edited collection is essential reading for any educator, researcher, or community-based practitioner concerned about the political implications of the family literacy movement.

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  • NurtureShock

    by Bronson and Merryman Year Published: 2009 Teaching Diversw Students

    One of the most influential books about children ever published, Nurture Shock offers a revolutionary new perspective on children that upends a library's worth of conventional wisdom. With impeccable storytelling and razor-sharp analysis, the authors demonstrate that many of modern society's strategies for nurturing children are in fact backfiring--because key twists in the science have been overlooked. Nothing like a parenting manual, NurtureShock gets to the core of how we grow, learn and live.

    Released in hardcover in September 2009, Nurture Shock remained on the New York Times best seller list for three months, and was one of Amazon's best selling books for 2009. The book has become a worldwide phenomenon with editions published around the world - in fifteen languages, to date.

    In addition to Bronson and Merryman's writings on praise -- first made famous in New York magazine -- there are nine more equally groundbreaking chapters. Among the topics covered:

    Why the most brutal person in a child's life is often a sibling, and how a single aspect of their preschool-aged play can determine their relationship as adults.

    When is it too soon - or too late - to teach a child about race? Children in diverse schools are less likely to have a cross-racial friendship, not more - so is school diversity backfiring?

    Millions of families are fighting to get their kids into private schools and advanced programs as early as possible. But schools are missing the best kids, 73% of the time - the new neuroscience explains why.

    Why are kids - even those from the best of homes - still aggressive and cruel? The answer is found in a rethinking of parental conflict, discipline, television's unexpected influence, and social dominance.

    Parents are desperate to jump-start infants' language skills. Recently, scientists have discovered a series of natural techniques that are astonishing in their efficacy - it's not baby videos, sign language, or even the richness of language exposure. It's nothing you've heard before.

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  • Other People's Children

    by Delpit Year Published: 1995 Teaching Diverse Students
    Winner of an American Educational Studies Association Critics’ Choice Award and Choice Magazine’s Outstanding Academic Book Award, and voted one of Teacher Magazine’s “great books,” Other People’s Children has sold over 150,000 copies since its original hardcover publication. This anniversary paperback edition features a new introduction by Delpit as well as new framing essays by Herbert Kohl and Charles Payne.

    In a radical analysis of contemporary classrooms, MacArthur Award–winning author Lisa Delpit develops ideas about ways teachers can be better “cultural transmitters” in the classroom, where prejudice, stereotypes, and cultural assumptions breed ineffective education. Delpit suggests that many academic problems attributed to children of color are actually the result of miscommunication, as primarily white teachers and “other people’s children” struggle with the imbalance of power and the dynamics plaguing our system.

    A new classic among educators, Other People’s Children is a must-read for teachers, administrators, and parents striving to improve the quality of America’s education system.
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  • Professional Capital

    by Hargreaves and Fullan Year Published: 2012 Leadership
    Winner of the 2015 Grawemeyer Award in Education! In this latest and most important collaboration, renowned educators Andy Hargreaves and Michael Fullan set out a groundbreaking new agenda to transform the future of teaching and public education. Ideas-driven, evidence-based, and strategically powerful, Professional Capitalcombats the tired arguments and stereotypes of teachers and teaching It includes action guidelines for classroom teachers, administrators, schools and districts, and state and federal leaders. This is a book that no one connected with schools can afford to ignore.



    ''Transforming education is one of the signature challenges of our times. Professional Capital sets out exactly and undeniably why the only way to do it is to honor and improve the profession of teaching. Written by two of the sharpest educational thinkers in the world, Professional Capital is an incisive critique of the failing reform movements in many countries and a powerful manifesto for the only strategy that can and does work. This book should revolutionize how policymakers and practitioners alike think and act in education. The price of failure is more than they or our children can afford.'' 
    --Sir Ken Robinson, educator, author



    ''A must-read! Brimming with insights and action ideas, Hargreaves and Fullan lay out a clear and cogent plan to transform American public education, community by community. Professional Capital is a finely written and urgent argument for real change in how we do our business.'' 
    --Dan Domenech, Executive Director, American Association of School Administrators



    ''This important book makes it clear that teaching stands at a crossroads between policy decisions that will help create a great profession for all teachers or ones that will make teaching robotic and unexciting--hurting student learning for years to come. Hargreaves and Fullan urge us not to stand aside or to wait. It is time, they say, for the teaching profession to be led by, for, and with teachers and for others to join in concerted action to support that transformation.''
    --Dennis Van Roekel, President, National Education Association



    ''I love the focus on professional capital and decisional capital. Hargreaves and Fullan give us a deep, practical understanding of ways to improve our schools and our school systems. This is new, exciting thinking.''
    --Steve Munby, Chief Executive, National College for School Leadership



    ''Michael Fullan and Andy Hargreaves' latest book shows that transforming our public school system isn't magic: It comes from supporting all educators to 'teach like a pro.' The best performing education systems focus on improving the entire profession, not just lauding the highest performers and lopping off the lowest. Hargreaves and Fullan have, once again, amassed the evidence to challenge our thinking and better our practice--from the teachers' lounge, to the union hall, to state and national policy tables. Their concept of 'professional capital' can help redefine and refocus efforts at all levels to build and maximize teaching capacity and improve results for students.'' 
    --Randi Weingarten, President, American Federation of Teachers



    ''The teaching profession is at a crossroads. Grounded in global knowledge and experience, Professional Capitalprovides brilliant insight into what the next generation of teaching should look like. This book is a must-read for anybody thinking of teaching in the 21st century.''
    --Pasi Sahlberg, Director General, CIMO at the Finnish Ministry of Education
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  • Racism Without Racists

    by Bonilla-Silva Year Published: 2014 Specific Race Topics

     Bonilla-Silva continues to challenge color-blind thinking. He has now extended this challenge with a new chapter on Obama's election addressing the apparent miracle of a black man elected as the 44th President of the nation despite the fact that racial progress has stagnated since the 1980s and, in some areas, even regressed. In contrast to those who believe the election of President Obama is a watershed moment that signifies the beginning of a post-racial era in America, he suggests this development embodies the racial trends of the last 40 years including two he has addressed in this book: the rise of color-blind racism as the dominant racial ideology and the emergence of an apparently more flexible racial stratification system he characterizes as Latin America-like.

    Some material from previous editions, including 'Answers to Questions from Concerned Readers,' 'What is to Be Done,' and an Appendix detailing interview questions, is now available on the Rowman & Littlefield website through the Teaching/Learning Resources link.

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  • Sister Citizen

    by Melissa V. Harris-Perry Year Published: 2011 Specific Race Topics

    Jezebel's sexual lasciviousness, Mammy's devotion, and Sapphire's outspoken anger—these are among the most persistent stereotypes that black women encounter in contemporary American life. Hurtful and dishonest, such representations force African American women to navigate a virtual crooked room that shames them and shapes their experiences as citizens. Many respond by assuming a mantle of strength that may convince others, and even themselves, that they do not need help. But as a result, the unique political issues of black women are often ignored and marginalized.

    In this groundbreaking book, Melissa V. Harris-Perry uses multiple methods of inquiry, including literary analysis, political theory, focus groups, surveys, and experimental research, to understand more deeply black women's political and emotional responses to pervasive negative race and gender images. Not a traditional political science work concerned with office-seeking, voting, or ideology, Sister Citizen instead explores how African American women understand themselves as citizens and what they expect from political organizing. Harris-Perry shows that the shared struggle to preserve an authentic self and secure recognition as a citizen links together black women in America, from the anonymous survivors of Hurricane Katrina to the current First Lady of the United States.

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  • Taking People With You

    by Novak Year Published: 2012 Leadership
    “AN IMPORTANT BOOK ABOUT MOTIVATION FROM A PROVEN MOTIVATOR.” —JACK WELCH

    Yum! Brands CEO David Novak learned long ago that you can’t lead a great organization of any size without getting your people aligned, enthusiastic, and focused relentlessly on the mission. But how do you do that? There are countless leadership books, but how many will actually help a Taco Bell shift manager, a Fortune 500 CEO, a new entrepreneur, or anyone in between?

    Over his fifteen years at Yum! Brands, Novak has developed a trademarked program—Taking People with You—that he personally teaches to thousands of managers around the world. He shows them how to make big things happen by getting people on their side. No skill in business is more important. And Yum!’s extraordinary success (at least 13 percent growth for each of the last ten years) proves his point.

    Novak knows that managers don’t need leadership platitudes or business school theories. So he cuts right to the chase with a step-by-step guide to setting big goals, building strong teams, blowing past your targets, and celebrating after you shock the skeptics. And then doing it again and again until consistent excellence becomes a core element of your culture.

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  • Teaching Boys

    by Cleveland Year Published: 2011 Instructional Strategies
    Finalist for a 2012 Distinguished Achievement Award from the Association of Educational Publishers! Teaching Boys Who Struggle in School: Strategies That Turn Underachievers into Successful Learners responds to growing concerns about a crisis in boys academic achievement. Kathleen Palmer Cleveland seeks to help K 12 educators cut through the hype to get at the real problem: who is underachieving, why are they struggling, and how can educators respond to these students needs in new and productive ways?

    Cleveland presents findings from four large-scale studies about how boys learn best and combines these findings with insights about ongoing social and learning-style factors that affect learning in the classroom, plus lesson plans and anecdotes from real teachers working across all grade levels and subject areas.

    Cleveland s Pathways to Re-Engagement represents the culmination of her substantial research and personal experience. A flexible and practical framework for decision making in the classroom, the Pathways model seeks to
    * Replace the underachieving boy s negative attitudes about learning;
    * Reconnect each boy with school, with learning, and with a belief in himself as a competent learner;
    * Rebuild learning skills that lead to success in school and in life; and
    * Reduce the need for unproductive and distracting behaviors as a means of self-protection.

    Each aspect of the Pathways to Re-Engagement model offers educators a way to move underachieving boys from a position of weakness toward one of strength--giving them the tools to succeed in school and beyond.
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  • Teaching Small

    by Teaching Tolerance Year Published: 1997 Instructional Strategies
    The vision of community that the early childhood classroom provides can color children's ideas and expectations about equity, cooperation and citizenship for a lifetime.
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  • Teaching with Poverty in Mind

    by Jensen Year Published: 2009 Impacts of Poverty
    In Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids' Brains and What Schools Can Do About It, veteran educator and brain expert Eric Jensen takes an unflinching look at how poverty hurts children, families, and communities across the United States and demonstrates how schools can improve the academic achievement and life readiness of economically disadvantaged students.

    Jensen argues that although chronic exposure to poverty can result in detrimental changes to the brain, the brain's very ability to adapt from experience means that poor children can also experience emotional, social, and academic success. A brain that is susceptible to adverse environmental effects is equally susceptible to the positive effects of rich, balanced learning environments and caring relationships that build students' resilience, self-esteem, and character.

    Drawing from research, experience, and real school success stories, Teaching with Poverty in Mind reveals:

    * What poverty is and how it affects students in school;
    * What drives change both at the macro level (within schools and districts) and at the micro level (inside a student's brain);
    * Effective strategies from those who have succeeded and ways to replicate those best practices at your own school; and
    * How to engage the resources necessary to make change happen.

    Too often, we talk about change while maintaining a culture of excuses. We can do better. Although no magic bullet can offset the grave challenges faced daily by disadvantaged children, this timely resource shines a spotlight on what matters most, providing an inspiring and practical guide for enriching the minds and lives of all your students.
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  • The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make

    by Covey Year Published: 2009 Instructional Strategies

    Making smart choices in challenging times

    The challenges teens face today are tougher than at any time in history: academic stress, parent communication, media bombardment, dating drama, abuse, bullying, addictions, depression, and peer pressure, just to name a few. And, like it or not, the choices teens make while navigating these challenges can make or break their futures. In The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make, Sean Covey, author of the international bestseller The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, gives teens the strong advice they need to make informed and wise decisions. Using real stories from teens around the world, Sean shows teens how to succeed in school, make good friends, get along with parents, wisely handle dating and sex issues, avoid or overcome addictions, build self-esteem, and much more. This innovative audiobook will help teens not only survive but thrive during their teen years and beyond. Building upon the legacy of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, this is an indispensable resource for teens everywhere.

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  • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens

    by Covey Year Published: 2009 Instructional Strategies

    Making smart choices in challenging times

    The challenges teens face today are tougher than at any time in history: academic stress, parent communication, media bombardment, dating drama, abuse, bullying, addictions, depression, and peer pressure, just to name a few. And, like it or not, the choices teens make while navigating these challenges can make or break their futures. In The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make, Sean Covey, author of the international bestseller The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, gives teens the strong advice they need to make informed and wise decisions. Using real stories from teens around the world, Sean shows teens how to succeed in school, make good friends, get along with parents, wisely handle dating and sex issues, avoid or overcome addictions, build self-esteem, and much more. This innovative audiobook will help teens not only survive but thrive during their teen years and beyond. Building upon the legacy of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, this is an indispensable resource for teens everywhere.

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  • The Code

    by Asgedom Year Published: 2003 Instructional Strategies
    Overcoming a childhood beset by civil war in East Africa and living on welfare in Chicago, the author grew up to attend Harvard on scholarship. Asgedom shares his experiences, insights, and five proven secrets that will help teens succeed in high school and beyond.
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  • The DreamKeepers

    by Ladson-Billings Year Published: 1994 Teaching Diverse Students
    The first edition and introduces us to new teachers who are current exemplars of good teaching. She shows that culturally relevant teaching is not a matter of race, gender, or teaching style. What matters most is a teacher's efforts to work with the unique strengths a child brings to the classroom. A brilliant mixture of scholarship and storytelling, The Dreamkeepers challenges us to envision intellectually rigorous and culturally relevant classrooms that have the power to improve the lives of not just African American students, but all children. 
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  • The Inner World of the Immigrant Child

    by Igoa Year Published: 1995 Teaching Diverse Students
    This powerful book tells the story of one teacher's odyssey to understand the inner world of immigrant children, and to create a learning environment that is responsive to these students' feelings and their needs. Featuring the voices and artwork of many immigrant children, this text portrays the immigrant experience of uprooting, culture shock, and adjustment to a new world, and then describes cultural, academic, and psychological interventions that facilitate learning as immigrant students make the transition to a new language and culture.

    Particularly relevant for courses dealing with multicultural and bilingual education, foundations of education, and literacy curriculum and instruction, this text is essential reading for all teachers who will -- or currently do -- work in today's school environment.
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  • We Can't Teach What We Don't Know

    by Howard Year Published: 2006 Teaching Diverse Students
    Once again, in this expanded Second Edition, Gary Howard outlines what good teachers know, what they do, and how they embrace culturally responsive teaching. Howard brings his bestselling book completely up to date with today’s school reform efforts and includes a new introduction and a new chapter that speak directly to current issues such as closing the achievement gap, and to recent legislation such as No Child Left Behind. With our nation’s student population becoming ever more diverse, and teachers remaining largely White, this book is now more important than ever. A must-read in universities and school systems throughout the country, We Can’t Teach What We Don’t Know continues to facilitate and deepen the discussion of race and social justice in education.
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  • Wherever I Go, I'll Always Be a Loyal American

    by Pak Year Published: 2002 Narrative
    Wherever I Go I'll Always Be a Loyal American is the story of how the Seattle public schools responded to the news of its Japanese American (Nisei) students' internment upon the signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 14, 1942. Drawing upon previously untapped letters and compositions written by the students themselves during the time in which the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the internment order took place, Pak explores how the schools and their students attempted to cope with evident contradiction and dissonance in democracy and citizenship. Emerging from the school district's tradition of emphasizing equality of all races and the government's forced evacuation orders based on racial exclusion, this dissonance became real and lived experience for Nisei school children, whose cognitive dissonance is best revealed in poignant phrases like "I am and will always be an American citizen."
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  • Whistling Vivaldi

    by Steele Year Published: 2010 Stereotypes and Bias

    The acclaimed social psychologist offers an insider’s look at his research and groundbreaking findings on stereotypes and identity.

    Claude M. Steele, who has been called “one of the few great social psychologists,” offers a vivid first-person account of the research that supports his groundbreaking conclusions on stereotypes and identity. He sheds new light on American social phenomena from racial and gender gaps in test scores to the belief in the superior athletic prowess of black men, and lays out a plan for mitigating these “stereotype threats” and reshaping American identities.
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  • You Can't Touch My Hair

    by Robinson Year Published: 2016 Narratives
    A NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLER • "A must-read…Phoebe Robinson discusses race and feminism in such a funny, real, and specific way, it penetrates your brain and stays with you." –Ilana Glazer, co-creator and co-star of Broad City

    A hilarious and timely essay collection about race, gender, and pop culture from upcoming comedy superstar and 2 Dope Queens podcaster Phoebe Robinson

    Being a black woman in America means contending with old prejudices and fresh absurdities every day. Comedian Phoebe Robinson has experienced her fair share over the years: she's been unceremoniously relegated to the role of "the black friend," as if she is somehow the authority on all things racial; she's been questioned about her love of U2 and Billy Joel ("isn’t that . . . white people music?"); she's been called "uppity" for having an opinion in the workplace; she's been followed around stores by security guards; and yes, people do ask her whether they can touch her hair all. the. time. Now, she's ready to take these topics to the page—and she’s going to make you laugh as she’s doing it.

    Using her trademark wit alongside pop-culture references galore, Robinson explores everything from why Lisa Bonet is "Queen. Bae. Jesus," to breaking down the terrible nature of casting calls, to giving her less-than-traditional advice to the future female president, and demanding that the NFL clean up its act, all told in the same conversational voice that launched her podcast, 2 Dope Queens, to the top spot on iTunes. As personal as it is political, You Can't Touch My Hair examines our cultural climate and skewers our biases with humor and heart, announcing Robinson as a writer on the rise.

    Featured on Refinery 29's list of "The Best Books Of 2016 So Far"
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