Welcome to the Equity and Family Engagement Department

  •  ****Due to the district closure impacted by COVID 19, the Equity and Family Engagement Department will be working remotely offsite. Please send an email to Kim Darcy or  Dr. Tanisha Brandon-Felder , Rebekah Gardea or call 206-393-4217 and you will receive a response within the day. Thank you.

     

      

     

     

    Native american heritage month

    November is National American Indian Heritage Month. 

     

    Snoqualmie Tribes 

    Kokanee Salmon Book

    Tulalip Tribes

    Native American Heritage Month Resources

    And even more!

     

     

     

     

     

     Equality vs Equity Shoreline Equity and Family Engagement Department

    The Purpose: To create urgency and immediate impact on students of color, and culturally and linguistically diverse students using culturally responsive practices and policies, while building racial equity awareness and skills with Shoreline staff. The work of the equity department expands throughout all district departments and programs. The goal is to lead and develop with equity in mind while examining and shifting  the inequities in our procedures, polices and practices. This work attends to hearts and minds so that we can make changes in structures and systems. The students are our non-negotiable WHY. 

     

    Holiday Baskets

    Holiday Basket Information

     

    If you have Questions about Remote Learning, click below:

    Remote Learning FAQs

     

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    Want to learn more? Want to take supportive action? Check out the resources below.

    BLM Resources

    BLM Website

    BLM in Schools Year of Purpose

    Black Books Reading Room

     

     

      

    We value all diversity in our students and families and staff. 

    Our hearts are with every group that has ever been targeted, been historically marginalized, been harassed, been abused, been publicly mocked and any other hurtful action. Shoreline students, familes and staff should thrive and flourish. Please hold us accountable to that.

    Anti racism quote oluo

     

     

     

     

     

     

      

     

Department Contacts

Book of the Month

  • Yakama Rising

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 11/5/2020

    Yakama Rising: Indigenous Cultural Revitalization, Activism, and Healing  (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies): Jacob, Michelle M.:  9780816531196: Amazon.com: Books

    The Yakama Nation of present-day Washington State has responded to more than a century of historical trauma with a resurgence of grassroots activism and cultural revitalization. This pathbreaking ethnography shifts the conversation from one of victimhood to one of ongoing resistance and resilience as a means of healing the soul wounds of settler colonialism. Yakama Rising: Indigenous Cultural Revitalization, Activism, and Healing argues that Indigenous communities themselves have the answers to the persistent social problems they face. This book contributes to discourses of Indigenous social change by articulating a Yakama decolonizing praxis that advances the premise that grassroots activism and cultural revitalization are powerful examples of decolonization.

    Michelle M. Jacob employs ethnographic case studies to demonstrate the tension between reclaiming traditional cultural practices and adapting to change. Through interviewees’ narratives, she carefully tacks back and forth between the atrocities of colonization and the remarkable actions of individuals committed to sustaining Yakama heritage. Focusing on three domains of Indigenous revitalization—dance, language, and foods—Jacob carefully elucidates the philosophy underlying and unifying each domain while also illustrating the importance of these practices for Indigenous self-determination, healing, and survival.

    In the impassioned voice of a member of the Yakama Nation, Jacob presents a volume that is at once intimate and specific to her home community and that also advances theories of Indigenous decolonization, feminism, and cultural revitalization. Jacob’s theoretical and methodological contributions make this work valuable to a range of students, academics, tribal community members, and professionals, and an essential read for anyone interested in the ways that grassroots activism can transform individual lives, communities, and society.

    Comments (-1)

Wordology

  • LatinX

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/2/2020
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  • Types of Racism

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/10/2020

    Race and Racism

    The idea of race has a complex history.  It has been used for centuries to categorize, reward, and penalize people based on perceived differences.  Despite often being misguidedly defined by skin tone and other physical attributes, race has no genetic basis.  This powerful social construction has a tremendous impact on individuals’ lives because it is often employed to establish and maintain privilege and power dynamics.  Access to resources and opportunities are often distributed along racial lines.

    Commonly defined as “prejudice + power,” racism is prejudice or discrimination against someone based on his/her race.  Underlying this is the belief that certain racial groups are superior to others.  Racism can be manifested through beliefs, policies, attitudes, and actions.  Racism comes in several forms, including:

     

    Individual or internalized racism – This is racism that exists within individuals.  It is when one holds negative ideas about his/her own culture, even if unknowingly.  Xenophobic feelings or one’s internalized sense of oppression/privilege are two examples of individual or internalized racism.

     

    Interpersonal racism – This is the racism that occurs between individuals.  It is the holding of negative attitudes towards a different race or culture.  Interpersonal racism often follows a victim/perpetrator model.

     

    Institutional racism – Recognizing that racism need not be individualist or intentional, institutional racism refers to institutional and cultural practices that perpetuate racial inequality.  Benefits are structured to advantage powerful groups as the expense of others.  Jim Crow laws and redlining practices are two examples of institutional racism.

     

    Structural racism – Structural racism refers to the ways in which the joint operation of institutions (i.e., inter-institutional arrangements and interactions) produce racialized outcomes, even in the absence of racist intent.  Indicators of structural racism include power inequalities, unequal access to opportunities, and differing policy outcomes by race.  Because these effects are reinforced across multiple institutions, the root causes of structural racism are difficult to isolate.  Structural racism is cumulative, pervasive, and durable.

    Comments (-1)
  • disability

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 10/2/2019

    The ADA defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. This includes people who have a record of such an impairment, even if they do not currently have a disability. It also includes individuals who do not have a disability but are regarded as having a disability. The ADA also makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person based on that person’s association with a person with a disability.

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  • Family Engagement

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 9/2/2019

    Family Engagement: Amended by Annie Gage- Family Advocate

    Family engagement describes what families do at home and in the community to support their children's learning and development. It also encompasses the shared partnership and responsibility, specifically with underserved families, between home and school. Such engagement is essential for school improvement.

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  • Multiracial

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 5/9/2019

    Biracial identity development includes self-identification A multiracial or biracialperson is someone whose parents or ancestors are from different ethnic backgrounds. ... While multiracial identity development refers to the process of identity development of individuals who self-identify with multiple racial groups.

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  • Agender

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 3/15/2019

    Agender is a term which can be literally translated as 'without gender'. It can be seen either as a non-binary gender identity or as a statement of not having a gender identity. People who identify as agender may describe themselves as one or more of the following: Genderless or lacking gender.

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  • Black Lives Matter

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 2/4/2019

    Black Lives Matter

    The Black Lives Matter Global Network is a chapter-based, member-led organization whose mission is to build local power and to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes.

    BLM is expansive. BLM is a collective of liberators who believe in an inclusive and spacious movement. BLM also believe that in order to win and bring as many people with us along the way, they must move beyond the narrow nationalism that is all too prevalent in Black communities.

    BLM affirms the lives of Black queer and trans folks, disabled folks, undocumented folks, folks with records, women, and all Black lives along the gender spectrum. Our network centers those who have been marginalized within Black liberation movements.

    BLM are working for a world where Black lives are no longer systematically targeted for demise.

    Black Lives Matter Website

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  • Double Consciousness

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 1/2/2019

    Double consciousness is a concept that Du Bois first explores in 1903 publication, “The Souls of Black Folk”. Double consciousness describes the individual sensation of feeling as though your identity is divided into several parts, making it difficult or impossible to have one unified identity.

     

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  • PTSD

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 12/4/2018

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may arise when people experience a traumatic event such as death, threatened death, serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence.* 

    This definition applies primarily to simple trauma, or exposure to one circumscribed traumatic event. By contrast, complex trauma may arise from exposure over time to prolonged, repeated trauma, such as physical or sexual abuse, neglect, or violence. The symptom pictures resulting from simple and complex trauma differ somewhat.

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  • Disability

    Posted by Tanisha Felder on 10/2/2018

    Disablity- a physical or mental condition that limits a person's movements, senses, or activities.

     

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